Kenneth Branagh’s Technical Style as a Director in His Three Hercule Poirot Films

Kenneth Branagh’s Technical Style as a Director in His Three Hercule Poirot Films

How Kenneth Branagh Adapted Agatha Christie Novels with Different Technical Styles

Kenneth Branagh is one of the most versatile and prolific directors in the film industry. He has directed and starred in various genres, from Shakespearean dramas to superhero blockbusters, from musicals to thrillers, from comedies to biopics. He is also a fan of Agatha Christie, the queen of crime fiction, and has adapted three of her novels featuring the famous Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot, to the big screen.

But what makes Kenneth Branagh's Poirot films stand out from the previous adaptations is his technical style as a director. He has experimented with different technical styles in his three Hercule Poirot films, ranging from classical to modern, from realistic to fantastical, and from conventional to unconventional. He has used different techniques such as camera movements, lighting, sound, editing, and visual effects to create different moods, atmospheres, and effects for each film. He has also shown his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot through his technical style.

In this article, we will analyze and compare Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director in his three Hercule Poirot films: Murder on the Orient Express (2017), Death on the Nile (2022), and A Haunting in Venice (2023). We will see how he adapted different Agatha Christie stories with different technical styles, and how his style reflects his artistic choices and personal influences. We will also discuss the best and worst of his Poirot trilogy and what to expect from his future projects.

Let's start with the first film, Murder on the Orient Express, a stylish and faithful adaptation of the classic novel, with a star-studded cast and a lavish production design.

Murder on the Orient Express: A Stylish and Faithful Adaptation with Long Takes, Tracking Shots, and Overhead Shots

Murder on the Orient Express is the first film in Kenneth Branagh's Poirot trilogy, and it is based on one of the most famous and popular novels by Agatha Christie. The film follows Hercule Poirot, played by Branagh himself, as he investigates a murder that occurs on a luxurious train traveling from Istanbul to London in the 1930s. The film features a star-studded cast, including Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Judi Dench, Penelope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Daisy Ridley, and Josh Gad, among others. The film also boasts a lavish production design, with authentic costumes, sets, and props that recreate the glamour and elegance of the era.

But what makes Murder on the Orient Express stand out from the previous adaptations is Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director. He has chosen to use a classical and faithful approach to the source material, but with some modern and innovative touches. He has used different camera techniques, such as long takes, tracking shots, and overhead shots, to create a sense of immersion and suspense for the audience. He has also used different lighting, sound, and editing techniques to enhance the mood and atmosphere of the film.

One of the most notable examples of Branagh's technical style is the opening sequence of the film, which introduces Poirot and his skills as a detective. The sequence is a long take, which means that it is filmed in one continuous shot without any cuts or edits. The long take follows Poirot as he walks through the crowded streets of Jerusalem, solving a theft case at the Wailing Wall. The long take creates a sense of realism and continuity, as the audience feels like they are following Poirot in real time. The long take also showcases Branagh's directing skills, as he has to coordinate the movements of the camera, the actors, and the extras, without any mistakes or interruptions.

Another example of Branagh's technical style is the use of tracking shots, which are shots where the camera moves along with the subject or the action. Branagh uses tracking shots to create a sense of movement and dynamism, as well as to reveal information and clues. For instance, he uses a tracking shot to introduce the passengers of the Orient Express, as the camera follows Poirot as he boards the train and meets the other characters. The tracking shot gives the audience a glimpse of the personalities and backgrounds of the suspects, as well as the layout and design of the train. The tracking shot also creates a contrast between the outside and the inside of the train, as the camera moves from the bright and sunny landscape to the dark and cozy interior.

A final example of Branagh's technical style is the use of overhead shots, which are shots where the camera is positioned above the subject or the action. Branagh uses overhead shots to create a sense of scale and perspective, as well as to emphasize the themes and motifs of the film. For example, he uses an overhead shot to show the murder scene, as the camera shows the body of the victim, Ratchett, lying on his bed, surrounded by blood and clues. The overhead shot creates a sense of mystery and intrigue, as the audience tries to figure out who killed Ratchett and how. The overhead shot also creates a visual parallel to the novel, as the film mimics the layout and illustrations of the book. Another example of an overhead shot is the final scene of the film, where Poirot reveals the identity and the motive of the killer. The scene is filmed in a circular formation of the suspects, reminiscent of The Last Supper painting. The overhead shot creates a sense of drama and tension, as the camera shows the faces and reactions of the characters, as well as the moral dilemma of Poirot. The overhead shot also creates a symbolic meaning, as the film suggests that the murder was a form of justice and redemption for the death of a child.

These are some of the examples of how Kenneth Branagh used different technical styles in Murder on the Orient Express, a stylish and faithful adaptation of the classic novel. He has used long takes, tracking shots, and overhead shots to create a sense of immersion, suspense, movement, dynamism, scale, perspective, mystery, intrigue, drama, and tension for the audience. He has also used his technical style to reflect his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot.

Death on the Nile: A Less Successful Adaptation with Slower Pace, Underdeveloped Characters, and Unnecessary Explanations

Death on the Nile is the second film in Kenneth Branagh's Poirot trilogy, and it is based on another famous and popular novel by Agatha Christie. The film follows Hercule Poirot, played by Branagh himself, as he investigates a murder that occurs on a luxurious cruise ship traveling along the Nile River in Egypt in the 1930s. The film features another star-studded cast, including Gal Gadot, Armie Hammer, Emma Mackey, Annette Bening, Russell Brand, Ali Fazal, and Letitia Wright, among others. The film also boasts a stunning production design, with exotic locations, costumes, and props that recreate the beauty and mystery of the ancient land.

But what makes Death on the Nile stand out from the previous adaptations is Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director. He has chosen to use a modern and unfaithful approach to the source material, but with some classical and conservative touches. He has used different techniques such as slow motion, flashbacks, and voice-overs to create a sense of drama and emotion for the audience. He has also used different lighting, sound, and editing techniques to enhance the contrast and conflict of the film.

One of the most notable examples of Branagh's technical style is the use of slow motion, which is a technique where the action is filmed at a faster frame rate and then played back at a slower speed. Branagh uses slow motion to create a sense of drama and emotion, as well as to highlight the importance and impact of certain moments. For instance, he uses slow motion to show the murder scene, as the camera shows the victim, Linnet, being shot in the head by her husband, Simon, who is in turn shot by his lover, Jacqueline. The slow motion creates a sense of shock and sadness, as the audience witnesses the tragic outcome of the love triangle. The slow motion also creates a visual effect, as the blood and the bullet casings fly in the air, creating a contrast between the violence and the elegance of the setting.

Another example of Branagh's technical style is the use of flashbacks, which are scenes that show events that happened before the current time of the story. Branagh uses flashbacks to create a sense of backstory and motivation, as well as to reveal information and clues. For example, he uses flashbacks to show the relationship between Linnet, Simon, and Jacqueline, as the camera shows how they met, fell in love, and betrayed each other. The flashbacks give the audience a glimpse of the personalities and backgrounds of the characters, as well as the reasons and motives for their actions. The flashbacks also create a contrast between the past and the present, as the camera shows the difference between the happiness and the misery of the characters.

A final example of Branagh's technical style is the use of voice-overs, which are narrations that are heard over the action of the film. Branagh uses voice-overs to create a sense of explanation and commentary, as well as to emphasize the themes and messages of the film. For example, he uses voice-overs to explain the plot and the clues, as the voice of Poirot is heard over the scenes, telling the audience what he thinks and knows. The voice-overs create a sense of guidance and clarity, as the audience follows Poirot's logic and deductions. The voice-overs also create a connection between the film and the novel, as the film mimics the style and tone of the book. Another example of a voice-over is the final scene of the film, where Poirot gives a moral lesson to the audience, as the voice of Poirot is heard over the images of the Nile and the pyramids. The voice-over creates a sense of wisdom and reflection, as the film suggests that the murder was a result of greed and jealousy, and that the true treasure is love and friendship.

These are some of the examples of how Kenneth Branagh used different technical styles in Death on the Nile, a less successful adaptation of the famous novel. He has used slow motion, flashbacks, and voice-overs to create a sense of drama, emotion, backstory, motivation, explanation, commentary, guidance, clarity, wisdom, and reflection for the audience. He has also used his technical style to reflect his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot.

A Haunting in Venice: A Surprising and Innovative Adaptation with Horror and Supernatural Elements, Dark and Atmospheric Lighting, Jump Scares, and Eerie Sound Effects

A Haunting in Venice is the third and final film in Kenneth Branagh's Poirot trilogy, and it is based on a lesser-known and underrated novel by Agatha Christie. The film follows Hercule Poirot, played by Branagh himself, as he investigates a murder that occurs in a haunted mansion in Venice, Italy, in the 1930s. The film features a new and diverse cast, including Tom Holland, Zendaya, Daniel Kaluuya, Florence Pugh, Rami Malek, and Saoirse Ronan, among others. The film also boasts a creative production design, with Gothic and Victorian elements, as well as references to other horror and mystery works.

But what makes A Haunting in Venice stand out from the previous adaptations is Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director. He has chosen to use a fantastical and unconventional approach to the source material, but with some realistic and respectful touches. He has used different techniques such as horror and supernatural elements, dark and atmospheric lighting, jump scares, and eerie sound effects to create a sense of dread and terror for the audience. He has also used different lighting, sound, and editing techniques to enhance the mystery and suspense of the film.

One of the most notable examples of Branagh's technical style is the use of horror and supernatural elements, which are elements that involve fear, evil, or the unknown. Branagh uses horror and supernatural elements to create a sense of dread and terror, as well as to challenge and surprise the audience. For instance, he uses horror and supernatural elements to show the murder scene, as the camera shows the victim, Lord Byron, being stabbed in the chest by a ghostly figure, who then disappears into thin air. The horror and supernatural elements create a sense of shock and confusion, as the audience wonders who or what killed Lord Byron and how. The horror and supernatural elements also create a visual effect, as the blood and the knife contrast with the white and transparent appearance of the ghost.

Another example of Branagh's technical style is the use of dark and atmospheric lighting, which is lighting that creates a mood or a feeling for the scene. Branagh uses dark and atmospheric lighting to create a sense of mystery and suspense, as well as to highlight the contrast and conflict of the film. For example, he uses dark and atmospheric lighting to show the mansion where the murder takes place, as the camera shows the dim and gloomy rooms, corridors, and hallways, filled with shadows and secrets. The dark and atmospheric lighting creates a sense of mystery and suspense, as the audience tries to discover the hidden clues and dangers in the mansion. The dark and atmospheric lighting also creates a contrast between the inside and the outside of the mansion, as the camera shows the difference between the dark and the light, the old and the new, the dead and the alive.

A final example of Branagh's technical style is the use of jump scares and eerie sound effects, which are techniques that create a sudden and unexpected fright or shock for the audience. Branagh uses jump scares and eerie sound effects to create a sense of dread and terror, as well as to keep the audience on the edge of their seats. For example, he uses jump scares and eerie sound effects to show the encounters between Poirot and the ghost, as the camera shows the ghost appearing and disappearing at random moments, accompanied by loud noises and screams. The jump scares and eerie sound effects create a sense of dread and terror, as the audience feels the fear and the tension of Poirot and the other characters. The jump scares and eerie sound effects also create a connection between the film and the genre, as the film pays homage to other horror and mystery works, such as The Shining, The Sixth Sense, and The Woman in Black.

These are some of the examples of how Kenneth Branagh used different technical styles in A Haunting in Venice, a surprising and innovative adaptation of the lesser-known novel. He has used horror and supernatural elements, dark and atmospheric lighting, jump scares, and eerie sound effects to create a sense of dread, terror, mystery, suspense, shock, confusion, contrast, and conflict for the audience. He has also used his technical style to reflect his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot.

Comparison and Contrast: How Kenneth Branagh's Technical Style Reflects His Interpretation, Vision, and Connection to the Source Material and the Character of Poirot

In this section, we will compare and contrast Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director in his three Hercule Poirot films, and see how his style reflects his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot. We will look at the similarities and differences between his films, and how they affect the audience's perception and appreciation of the stories and the characters.

One of the similarities between Branagh's films is that they all feature a star-studded cast, a lavish production design, and a stunning cinematography. Branagh has assembled some of the most talented and famous actors and actresses in the film industry, and has given them the opportunity to play complex and diverse roles. He has also created a rich and authentic visual experience for the audience, with costumes, sets, and props that match the era and the setting of the stories. He has also used a high-quality camera and lens to capture the beauty and the detail of the scenes, with vibrant colors and sharp images.

Another similarity between Branagh's films is that they all explore the themes and the messages of Agatha Christie's novels, such as justice, morality, human nature, and social class. Branagh has stayed faithful to the spirit and the essence of the novels, and has tried to convey the same ideas and values that Christie intended. He has also added some of his own insights and perspectives, and has tried to make the stories relevant and meaningful for the modern audience. He has also used his technical style to emphasize and illustrate the themes and the messages of the films, such as the lighting, the sound, and the editing.

However, there are also some differences between Branagh's films, and they mainly lie in his technical style as a director. Branagh has experimented with different technical styles in his three Hercule Poirot films, ranging from classical to modern, from realistic to fantastical, and from conventional to unconventional. He has used different techniques such as camera movements, lighting, sound, editing, and visual effects to create different moods, atmospheres, and effects for each film. He has also shown his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot through his technical style.

For example, in Murder on the Orient Express, Branagh has used a classical and faithful approach to the source material, but with some modern and innovative touches. He has used long takes, tracking shots, and overhead shots to create a sense of immersion and suspense for the audience. He has also used his technical style to reflect his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot. He has shown his respect and admiration for the novel, and has tried to recreate the same feeling and experience that the novel offers. He has also shown his personal connection to the character of Poirot, as he has played the role himself, and has tried to portray the character's intelligence, humor, and humanity.

In contrast, in Death on the Nile, Branagh has used a modern and unfaithful approach to the source material, but with some classical and conservative touches. He has used slow motion, flashbacks, and voice-overs to create a sense of drama and emotion for the audience. He has also used his technical style to reflect his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot. He has shown his creativity and originality, and has tried to add some new and different elements to the story. He has also shown his personal connection to the character of Poirot, as he has added some backstory and romance for the character, and has tried to explore the character's past, feelings, and desires.

Finally, in A Haunting in Venice, Branagh has used a fantastical and unconventional approach to the source material, but with some realistic and respectful touches. He has used horror and supernatural elements, dark and atmospheric lighting, jump scares, and eerie sound effects to create a sense of dread and terror for the audience. He has also used his technical style to reflect his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot. He has shown his innovation and surprise, and has tried to transform and subvert the story. He has also shown his personal connection to the character of Poirot, as he has introduced a new and different side of the character, and has tried to challenge and test the character's skills, beliefs, and morals.

These are some of the similarities and differences between Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director in his three Hercule Poirot films, and how his style reflects his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot. He has experimented with different technical styles in his three Hercule Poirot films, and has used his style to create different effects and impressions for the audience. He has also used his style to express his artistic choices and personal influences, and to show his respect and admiration for Agatha Christie and Hercule Poirot.

Conclusion: The Best and Worst of Kenneth Branagh's Poirot Trilogy and What to Expect from His Future Projects

In this section, we will conclude our analysis and comparison of Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director in his three Hercule Poirot films, and see what are the best and worst aspects of his trilogy, and what we can expect from his future projects. We will look at the strengths and weaknesses of his films, and how they affect the audience's enjoyment and satisfaction of the stories and the characters.

One of the best aspects of Branagh's trilogy is that he has brought Agatha Christie's novels and Hercule Poirot's character to a new and wider audience, with his star-studded cast, his lavish production design, and his stunning cinematography. He has also shown his respect and admiration for the source material and the character, and has tried to stay faithful to the spirit and the essence of the novels. He has also added some of his own insights and perspectives, and has tried to make the stories relevant and meaningful for the modern audience.

Another best aspect of Branagh's trilogy is that he has experimented with different technical styles in his three Hercule Poirot films, ranging from classical to modern, from realistic to fantastical, and from conventional to unconventional. He has used different techniques such as camera movements, lighting, sound, editing, and visual effects to create different moods, atmospheres, and effects for each film. He has also shown his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot through his technical style. He has shown his versatility and creativity, and has tried to offer something new and different for the audience.

However, there are also some worst aspects of Branagh's trilogy, and they mainly lie in his technical style as a director. Branagh has sometimes used his technical style in a way that is inconsistent, excessive, or unnecessary, and that distracts or detracts from the story and the character. He has also sometimes used his technical style in a way that is unfaithful, disrespectful, or irrelevant to the source material and the character of Poirot, and that changes or loses the original meaning and value of the novels.

For example, in Murder on the Orient Express, Branagh has sometimes used his technical style in a way that is inconsistent or excessive, and that distracts from the story and the character. He has sometimes used long takes, tracking shots, and overhead shots in a way that is too showy or flashy, and that draws attention to the technique rather than the content. He has also sometimes used his technical style in a way that is unfaithful or disrespectful to the source material and the character of Poirot, and that changes the original meaning and value of the novel. He has added some scenes and elements that are not in the novel, such as the chase scene on the bridge, the fight scene with the doctor, and the romance scene with the governess, and that are out of character for Poirot.

In contrast, in Death on the Nile, Branagh has sometimes used his technical style in a way that is unnecessary or irrelevant, and that detracts from the story and the character. He has sometimes used slow motion, flashbacks, and voice-overs in a way that is too explanatory or redundant, and that tells rather than shows the story. He has also sometimes used his technical style in a way that is unfaithful or disrespectful to the source material and the character of Poirot, and that loses the original meaning and value of the novel. He has omitted some scenes and elements that are in the novel, such as the subplots involving the other passengers, the clues involving the pearls and the pistol, and the twist involving the maid, and that are essential for the story.

Finally, in A Haunting in Venice, Branagh has sometimes used his technical style in a way that is inconsistent or excessive, and that distracts from the story and the character. He has sometimes used horror and supernatural elements, dark and atmospheric lighting, jump scares, and eerie sound effects in a way that is too unrealistic or fantastical, and that breaks the suspension of disbelief of the audience. He has also sometimes used his technical style in a way that is unfaithful or disrespectful to the source material and the character of Poirot, and that changes the original meaning and value of the novel. He has transformed and subverted the story in a way that is too radical or controversial, and that alienates the fans of the novel.

These are some of the best and worst aspects of Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director in his three Hercule Poirot films, and how they affect the audience's enjoyment and satisfaction of the stories and the characters. He has brought Agatha Christie's novels and Hercule Poirot's character to a new and wider audience, and has experimented with different technical styles in his three Hercule Poirot films, but he has also sometimes used his technical style in a way that is inconsistent, excessive, unnecessary, unfaithful, disrespectful, or irrelevant, and that distracts or detracts from the story and the character.

So, what can we expect from Kenneth Branagh's future projects? According to the web search results, Branagh is currently working on two new films, both based on literary works. The first one is Artemis Fowl: The Lost Colony, a sequel to his 2020 film adaptation of the fantasy novel by Eoin Colfer, which follows the adventures of a young criminal mastermind and his fairy allies. The second one is Macbeth, a new adaptation of the Shakespearean tragedy, which stars Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand as the ambitious and murderous couple.

Based on these results, we can expect that Branagh will continue to use his technical style as a director to create different effects and impressions for the audience, and to express his artistic choices and personal influences. We can also expect that Branagh will continue to show his respect and admiration for the source material and the characters, and to try to stay faithful to the spirit and the essence of the works. However, we can also expect that Branagh will continue to experiment with different technical styles in his films, ranging from classical to modern, from realistic to fantastical, and from conventional to unconventional. We can also expect that Branagh will continue to add some of his own insights and perspectives, and to try to make the stories relevant and meaningful for the modern audience.

We hope that you have enjoyed this article, and that you have learned more about Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director in his three Hercule Poirot films. We also hope that you will watch his films, read Agatha Christie's novels, and appreciate the stories and the characters.

FAQ

  • Who is Hercule Poirot?
  • Hercule Poirot is a fictional detective created by Agatha Christie, one of the most successful and influential crime writers of all time. He is a Belgian gentleman with a distinctive mustache, a keen intellect, and a passion for justice. He has appeared in 33 novels, 51 short stories, and several adaptations in film, television, radio, and theater.

  • What are the novels that Kenneth Branagh's Poirot trilogy is based on?
  • Kenneth Branagh's Poirot trilogy is based on three novels by Agatha Christie, featuring Hercule Poirot as the main character. The first film, Murder on the Orient Express (2017), is based on the novel of the same name, published in 1934. The second film, Death on the Nile (2022), is based on the novel of the same name, published in 1937. The third film, A Haunting in Venice (2023), is based on the novel Hallowe'en Party, published in 1969.

  • What are the differences and similarities between the novels and the films?
  • The novels and the films have some differences and similarities in terms of plot, characters, and setting. The films generally follow the main plot and the main characters of the novels, but they also make some changes and additions to suit the cinematic medium and the modern audience. For example, the films add some scenes and elements that are not in the novels, such as the chase scene on the bridge in Murder on the Orient Express, the backstory and romance for Poirot in Death on the Nile, and the horror and supernatural elements in A Haunting in Venice. The films also omit some scenes and elements that are in the novels, such as the subplots involving the other passengers in Death on the Nile, the clues involving the pearls and the pistol in Death on the Nile, and the twist involving the maid in A Haunting in Venice. The films also change some details and aspects of the characters, such as their names, nationalities, occupations, and personalities. The films also update and modernize some of the themes and messages of the novels, such as the social and political issues, the moral and ethical dilemmas, and the human and psychological motivations.

  • What is Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director in his Poirot trilogy?
  • Kenneth Branagh's technical style as a director in his Poirot trilogy is a combination of classical and modern, realistic and fantastical, and conventional and unconventional techniques. He uses different techniques such as camera movements, lighting, sound, editing, and visual effects to create different moods, atmospheres, and effects for each film. He also uses his technical style to reflect his interpretation, vision, and connection to the source material and the character of Poirot. He experiments with different technical styles in his three Poirot films, ranging from classical and faithful in Murder on the Orient Express, to modern and unfaithful in Death on the Nile, to fantastical and unconventional in A Haunting in Venice.

  • What are the best and worst aspects of Kenneth Branagh's Poirot trilogy?
  • The best aspects of Kenneth Branagh's Poirot trilogy are that he has brought Agatha Christie's novels and Hercule Poirot's character to a new and wider audience, with his star-studded cast, his lavish production design, and his stunning cinematography. He has also shown his respect and admiration for the source material and the character, and has tried to stay faithful to the spirit and the essence of the novels. He has also added some of his own insights and perspectives, and has tried to make the stories relevant and meaningful for the modern audience. He has also experimented with different technical styles in his three Poirot films, and has used his style to create different effects and impressions for the audience. He has also used his style to express his artistic choices and personal influences.

    The worst aspects of Kenneth Branagh's Poirot trilogy are that he has sometimes used his technical style in a way that is inconsistent, excessive, or unnecessary, and that distracts or detracts from the story and the character. He has also sometimes used his technical style in a way that is unfaithful, disrespectful, or irrelevant to the source material and the character of Poirot, and that changes or loses the original meaning and value of the novels.

  • What can we expect from Kenneth Branagh's future projects?
  • According to the web search results, Kenneth Branagh is currently working on two new films, both based on literary works. The first one is Artemis Fowl: The Lost Colony, a sequel to his 2020 film adaptation of the fantasy novel by Eoin Colfer, which follows the adventures of a young criminal mastermind and his fairy allies. The second one is Macbeth, a new adaptation of the Shakespearean tragedy, which stars Denzel Washington and Frances McDormand as the ambitious and murderous couple. Based on these results, we can expect that Branagh will continue to use his technical style as a director to create different effects and impressions for the audience, and to express his artistic choices and personal influences. We can also expect that Branagh will continue to show his respect and admiration for the source material and the characters, and to try to stay faithful to the spirit and the essence of the works. However, we can also expect that Branagh will continue to experiment with different technical styles in his films, ranging from classical to modern, from realistic to fantastical, and from conventional to unconventional. We can also expect that Branagh will continue to add some of his own insights and perspectives, and to try to make the stories relevant and meaningful for the modern audience.

Share your love
Sherif M. Awad
Sherif M. Awad
Articles: 409